Summary

In this fascinating follow-up to his New York Times bestseller Wilderness Warrior, acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley offers a riveting, expansive look at the past and present battle to preserve Alaska’s wilderness. Brinkley explores the colorful diversity of Alaska’s wildlife, arrays the forces that have wreaked havoc on its primeval arctic refuge—from Klondike Gold Rush prospectors to environmental disasters like the Exxon-Valdez oil spill—and documents environmental heroes from Theodore Roosevelt to Dwight Eisenhower and beyond. Not merely a record of Alaska’s past, Quiet World is a compelling call-to-arms for sustainability, conservationism, and conscientious environmental stewardship—a warning that the land once called Seward’s Folly may go down in history as America’s Greatest Mistake.


Popular historian Brinkley here helps us celebrate the 50th anniversary of President Eisenhower's December 6, 1960, executive order creating Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. He opens with Teddy Roosevelt, then moves through to the 1950s, when a group of environmentalists ranging from Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas to the Walt Disney Corporation helped fight off the drillers and secure the refuge. One of my nonfiction favorites; with a 150,000-copy first printing.


In this fascinating follow-up to his New York Times bestseller Wilderness Warrior, acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley offers a riveting, expansive look at the past and present battle to preserve Alaska's wilderness. Brinkley explores the colorful diversity of Alaska's wildlife, arrays the forces that have wreaked havoc on its primeval arctic refuge--from Klondike Gold Rush prospectors to environmental disasters like the Exxon-Valdez oil spill--and documents environmental heroes from Theodore Roosevelt to Dwight Eisenhower and beyond. Not merely a record of Alaska's past, Quiet World is a compelling call-to-arms for sustainability, conservationism, and conscientious environmental stewardship--a warning that the land once called Seward's Folly may go down in history as America's Greatest Mistake.