Summary

When a beat cop pauses from taking a bite out of crime, he takes a bite out of donuts, polish sausage, fried chicken, enchiladas, and omelettes to deliver tongue-in-cheek expertise in this follow-up to the 2004 award-winningThe Streets & San Man''s Guide to Chicago Eats. This time around, Sgt. David J. Haynes of the Chicago Police Department and his partner-in-crime, blogger Christopher Garlington, provide a street-level guide to the best mom-and-pop food bargains in Chicago.

When the Beat Cop pauses from taking a bite out of crime, he takes a bite out of donuts, polish sausage, fried chicken, enchiladas, and omelettes...

Lake Claremont Press''s 2004 award-winner,The Streets & San Man''s Guide to Chicago Eats, delivered tongue-in-cheek style and food-in-mouth expertise by a certified expert of the City of Chicago''s Department of Lunch: streets & sanitation department electrician Dennis Foley.

Now, Sgt. David J. Haynes of the Chicago Police Department, and his partner-in-crime, blogger Christopher Garlington, want to take on Foley''s street-level guide to the best mom-and-pop food bargains in Chicago with their follow-up:The Beat Cop''s Guide to Chicago Eats. "We''re funnier, better-looking, and have the street smarts, girth, and weaponry to meet him in any alley, taqueria, or rib joint."

He''s no chef, food writer, or restaurateur. A former marine, Sgt. Haynes has spent the past 15 years dodging bullets and chasing down gang bangers on the city''s West Side, running Chicago''s first ever Homeland Security Task Force, and supervising squads in the 19th District at Belmont and Western. During those years, one of his most daunting tasks--and indeed one of the most important ones--was to get lunch.

Laugh if you want to. Getting lunch for 20 hungry cops who have been riding around in the freezing Chicago winter or blistering summer heat requires a remarkable degree of diplomacy, grit, and street savvy. Seriously, these folks are armed! They''re out there putting their lives on the line hour by hour; and when their stomachs are growling, they''re not calling for a Big Mac. They want real food--good food--the kind of food that makes them forget about the mean streets of Chi-Town for half an hour. They want Italian beefs, stuffed pizza, and catfish nuggets; they want ribs, red hots, and pulled pork sandwiches. Some even want salads.

Navigating this volatile terrain has become second nature to Sgt. Haynes. His knowledge of local eateries comes hard-earned from years on the beat and years of fierce debate with other cops. Haynes''s understanding of the best places to get lunch in Chicago makes for an unprecedented blue-collar guide to the best food in the Windy City. You know we''re not talking white tablecloths and Perrier.

The cafes and counters in this book are the places where locals go to get a sandwich. They''re the places that cater church suppers. Go to one of these joints and you''ll sit shoulder to shoulder with pipe fitters, bricklayers, yardmen, sanitation removal engineers, pimps, organized crime leaders, and cabbies.

And cops. Because first and foremost, this book is about where cops eat. On any given day at any of these restaurants, you''ll find yourself eating with some of the 11,000 men and women who help keep our city safe. This book is dedicated to them. "The idea," says Haynes, "is to get in, get a good meal, and get out before your lunch break ends for under ten bucks." Peppered with outrageous stories from working cops, Chicago cop lore, and even a few recipes,The Beat Cop''s Guidetakes you on a gustatory journey through all five CPD areas, including some of the toughest neighborhoods in the nation.

The Beat Cop''s Guide to Chicago Eatscomes at a time when Chicagoans really need it. The economy is in a slump like never before. Times are tough. Money is tight. The Beat Cop doesn''t just direct you to a great meal for eight bucks--he''s secured you your very own police discount.The book retails at $15.95 and includes $34 in coupons.It''s like being buddies with your alderman.