Reviews

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

For many, Islam has taken the place of communism as the bogeyman of the post-9/11 world, according to Prashad, South Asian history professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. With sharp and urgent commentary, he analyzes how fundamentalists in the Christian, Jewish, and Hindi communities have become hostile to all things Muslim, using 9/11 as justification against the common enemy of Islamic terrorism threatening the U.S., Israel, and India. At the same time, Jews and Indians are viewed as model minorities in the U.S. His scholarly analysis of the current Islamophobia is laced with great quotes from scholars and activists, including Gandhi on the limits of tradition and Tolstoy on feel-good liberalism (give to the poor but don't change anything). Like Prashad's prizewinning The Darker Nations (2008), this is bound to spark discussion as he juxtaposes the platitudes of multiculturalism, which celebrate the peoples and traditions of other lands (Africa, Asia, Latin America), against the unchanging truth that non-Western continues to be viewed as subordinate.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

As Trinity College's South Asian history professor Prashad (The Karma of Brown Folk) writes, for South Asian-Americans, "the miasma of international relations interrupts our lives constantly." His latest begins by illustrating the ways in which Islamophobia and hate crimes ran rife against South Asians after 9/11-tensions exacerbated by outsourced jobs and the growing unemployment rate. Random screenings on mass transit, mistaken detainment, and deportation are among the trials this population faced under legislation like the Patriot Act. To rectify the misinformation, Prashad explains how immigration policy and labor laws shaped South Asian culture, from the prolific rise of the Patels in the hotel industry to indentured servitude in post-Katrina New Orleans. In addition, he traces the rise of South Asian political activism from WWI through the 9/11 attacks that pressured South Asians to unite across disparate cultural and religious lines. Prashad impressively shows how culture and community are intrinsically tied to politics, while addressing nuances in a culture often marginalized by the media. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

For many, Islam has taken the place of communism as the bogeyman of the post-9/11 world, according to Prashad, South Asian history professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. With sharp and urgent commentary, he analyzes how fundamentalists in the Christian, Jewish, and Hindi communities have become hostile to all things Muslim, using 9/11 as justification against the common enemy of Islamic terrorism threatening the U.S., Israel, and India. At the same time, Jews and Indians are viewed as model minorities in the U.S. His scholarly analysis of the current Islamophobia is laced with great quotes from scholars and activists, including Gandhi on the limits of tradition and Tolstoy on feel-good liberalism (give to the poor but don't change anything). Like Prashad's prizewinning The Darker Nations (2008), this is bound to spark discussion as he juxtaposes the platitudes of multiculturalism, which celebrate the peoples and traditions of other lands (Africa, Asia, Latin America), against the unchanging truth that non-Western continues to be viewed as subordinate.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

As Trinity College's South Asian history professor Prashad (The Karma of Brown Folk) writes, for South Asian-Americans, "the miasma of international relations interrupts our lives constantly." His latest begins by illustrating the ways in which Islamophobia and hate crimes ran rife against South Asians after 9/11-tensions exacerbated by outsourced jobs and the growing unemployment rate. Random screenings on mass transit, mistaken detainment, and deportation are among the trials this population faced under legislation like the Patriot Act. To rectify the misinformation, Prashad explains how immigration policy and labor laws shaped South Asian culture, from the prolific rise of the Patels in the hotel industry to indentured servitude in post-Katrina New Orleans. In addition, he traces the rise of South Asian political activism from WWI through the 9/11 attacks that pressured South Asians to unite across disparate cultural and religious lines. Prashad impressively shows how culture and community are intrinsically tied to politics, while addressing nuances in a culture often marginalized by the media. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.