Reviews

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

*Starred Review* Writing with rare verve (A black hole is nothing to look at. Literally.), DeCristofano condenses recent astronomical discoveries into a high-energy account of what we know or guess about one of the universe's deepest and most unobservable secrets. Covering the life cycles of stars; the formation of black holes and weird optical and physical effects associated with them; more recent revelations of super-sized black holes at the centers of galaxies; and the general effects of mass on space, light, and matter, she presents a clear, well-rounded picture of the strange structure and stranger physics of black holes. After leading a wild ride over a black hole's event horizon (Right away, you would need a new nickname something like Stretch . . . .) and explaining theories about gravity from Newton's notions to Einstein's Spacey Ideas, DeCristofano leaves readers to ponder the truth of her claim that a black hole isn't a hole but NOT exactly NOT a hole either. Enhanced by a time line and a generous set of further resources and illustrated with plenty of cogent diagrams, space photographs, and Carroll's dramatic images of stellar whirlpools and mammoth jets of gas around cores of impenetrable blackness this book will snatch readers from their orbits and fling them into a lasting fascination with nature's most attractive phenomena. Literally.--Peters, John Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 5-7-This introduction to black holes takes readers from simple to complex by dropping definitions and information slowly and clearly into the lively narrative. Dramatic and amazing illustrations help to impart the sense of the vast distances in space, of how atomic nuclei meld in the intense interaction called fusion, and how the areas of a black hole-the event boundary, the extreme gravity zone, and the singularity-are defined. The appended time line begins with Newton's work on gravity in 1687 and ends with the theoretical shining of a flashlight toward our galaxy's black hole (Sagittarius A*, with a mass four million times that of our Sun) in 2012, which would take about 3600 years to reach its goal. The author's list of print resources credits classic science titles. Her website list cautions that the sites may not stay current, and she recommends using a search engine to get at the most up-to-date data. A four-page glossary provides succinct definitions and some pronunciation guides. The one-page index leads readers back to the text for many of the terms found in the glossary, e.g., "spaghettification," as well as for many of the scientists mentioned throughout. Informative, fun, and so beautiful that even general readers will be drawn into it.-Frances E. Millhouser, formerly at Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 5-7-This introduction to black holes takes readers from simple to complex by dropping definitions and information slowly and clearly into the lively narrative. Dramatic and amazing illustrations help to impart the sense of the vast distances in space, of how atomic nuclei meld in the intense interaction called fusion, and how the areas of a black hole-the event boundary, the extreme gravity zone, and the singularity-are defined. The appended time line begins with Newton's work on gravity in 1687 and ends with the theoretical shining of a flashlight toward our galaxy's black hole (Sagittarius A*, with a mass four million times that of our Sun) in 2012, which would take about 3600 years to reach its goal. The author's list of print resources credits classic science titles. Her website list cautions that the sites may not stay current, and she recommends using a search engine to get at the most up-to-date data. A four-page glossary provides succinct definitions and some pronunciation guides. The one-page index leads readers back to the text for many of the terms found in the glossary, e.g., "spaghettification," as well as for many of the scientists mentioned throughout. Informative, fun, and so beautiful that even general readers will be drawn into it.-Frances E. Millhouser, formerly at Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.