Reviews

School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PreS-K-There is nothing that makes this title stand out. Die-cut holes offer hints about which animal appears on the following spread. "I spy...something white that begins with an L. Baaa, baaa!" The digital illustrations appear sketchy and careless, the background of each scene has a generic look, and the whole package has the feel of having been put together with little effort, perhaps capitalizing on the success of Gibbs's I Spy with My Little Eye (Candlewick/Templar, 2011).-Heidi Estrin, Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Reprising the animal-identification game played in Gibbs' I Spy with My Little Eye (2011) and I Spy under the Sea (2012), this large, brightly illustrated picture book introduces farm animals, colors, and letters of the alphabet. The text begins, I spy with my little eye . . . / something yellow that starts with a D. On the left-hand page, a three-inch circle frames a yellow animal's eye, and on a facing page, a two-and-a-half-inch hole reveals the animal's textured side. If those hints are too subtle and they might be a speech balloon carries the words quack, quack! A turn of the page reveals a smiling animal, who says, I'm a DUCKLING. While the large pictures of animals show up well from a distance, the small elements seen through the holes do not. Still, the holes themselves are a playful element that will be inviting to young children singly or in small groups. Featuring tiny silhouettes of the animals and a question What do you spy with your little eyes? the final page is a satisfying conclusion.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist