Reviews

Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

In her fifth Walsh Sister novel (after Anybody Out There?), Keyes focuses on misanthropic youngest sister, Helen. In Post-Celtic Tiger Ireland, with her PI business dried up and her flat lost, Helen has moved back in with her flighty parents rather than with her boyfriend, Artie, a high-level forensics cop with three kids and an uncomfortably close relationship with his ex. Helen lands a job from old beau Jay, who is handling the reunion of '90s boy band the Laddz, provided she can get the reluctant Wayne Diffney, a.k.a. "the Wacky One," on board; the others-"the Talented One," "the Cute One," "the Gay One," and "the Other One"-are getting in shape and rehearsing. Helen likes the money the gig will bring, but Jay's desire to rekindle their relationship sinks her into another major depression, and she's not sure Artie will be able to handle it. Though the excessively noisy mystery gets too much play, Keyes's portrayal of depression is nuanced and authentic. Helen's vibrant voice is spot-on, and scenes with Artie illustrate her off-kilter personality, making it easy to see why he loves her. Agent: Jonathan Lloyd, Curtis Brown (U.K.) (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Keyes (The Brightest Star in the Sky) continues to write frothy, fun books from across the pond, this time tackling a mystery. Helen Walsh, a struggling private investigator living in Dublin, is battling severe depression, has been kicked out of her flat, and has no job. But she faces all this with a crackling dry wit and clever, sarcastic comments. When an old flame tracks her down to seek her help in finding a missing person, she's on the case. Ireland's biggest 1990s boy band, the Laddz, are having a reunion tour. But one unwilling member, Wayne (The Wacky One), has flown the coop. Helen must find out whether he skipped by choice or force. Can she stay sane enough to complete her task? Throw in Helen's hunky new boyfriend (complete with three kids and an ever-present ex-wife) and her nutty Mum and sisters (previously encountered in Angels and Anybody Out There?), and there are plenty of obstacles to avert. VERDICT While Helen's voice, a mix of Stephanie Plum and Bridget Jones, is consistently amusing, the storyline is dragged down by the slow pacing. [See Prepub Alert, 10/15/12.]-Beth Gibbs, Davidson, NC (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Keyes brings back the popular Walsh family, this time in a decidedly different kind of novel. Instead of the laugh-out-loud women's-fiction milieu in which the other Walsh sisters appear (Watermelon, 1998; Anybody Out There? 2006; etc.), Keyes goes for a darker tone and tosses in a bit of a mystery. Helen Walsh is a depressive private investigator on the brink of a nervous breakdown. Her flat has been foreclosed, her clients are leaving her, and she's not quite sure where she stands with her new boyfriend. When ex-boyfriend Jay, a music producer, hires her to track down the missing member of a boy band, she reluctantly takes the job. After all, a girl's gotta pay the bills. What seems like an easy case gets twisty when Helen discovers just how many people stand to lose money if the reunion doesn't go off as planned, and everyone from bandmates to neighbors to shady con men becomes a suspect. Not quite a mystery, not quite standard women's fiction, this will still appeal to Keyes' many fans.--Vnuk, Rebecca Copyright 2010 Booklist


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Keyes (The Brightest Star in the Sky) continues to write frothy, fun books from across the pond, this time tackling a mystery. Helen Walsh, a struggling private investigator living in Dublin, is battling severe depression, has been kicked out of her flat, and has no job. But she faces all this with a crackling dry wit and clever, sarcastic comments. When an old flame tracks her down to seek her help in finding a missing person, she's on the case. Ireland's biggest 1990s boy band, the Laddz, are having a reunion tour. But one unwilling member, Wayne (The Wacky One), has flown the coop. Helen must find out whether he skipped by choice or force. Can she stay sane enough to complete her task? Throw in Helen's hunky new boyfriend (complete with three kids and an ever-present ex-wife) and her nutty Mum and sisters (previously encountered in Angels and Anybody Out There?), and there are plenty of obstacles to avert. VERDICT While Helen's voice, a mix of Stephanie Plum and Bridget Jones, is consistently amusing, the storyline is dragged down by the slow pacing. [See Prepub Alert, 10/15/12.]-Beth Gibbs, Davidson, NC (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.