Reviews

Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Pearson, an actress in the TV drama The Wire, was born a crack baby in Baltimore and raised in a foster home. Here, with collaborator Ritz, she chronicles living on the streets, dealing drugs, and ending up in prison for killing a woman in self-defense. (Xpress Reviews, 10/21/07) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Pearson, who stars in HBO's The Wire, was born ill and underweight from her mother's drug habits, and later worked for a crack dealer in East Baltimore. At age 15 she killed a woman in self-defense and wound up in the Jessup State Penitentiary. She got a wakeup call when the notorious dealers she called "Uncle" and "Father" wound up respectively dead and imprisoned for life. Once out on parole, Pearson took an assembly-line job and "didn't give [her neighborhood dope dealers] a second glance," but after repeatedly getting fired because of her rap sheet, she returned to dealing before a chance meeting gave her a way off the street for good. This isn't a light celebrity bio, but a powerful story of someone trying to find her way in a dark world, realizing she can still choose her life's direction even in tremendously difficult circumstances. Pearson's narrative is spare, even poetic, rendering traumatic moments all the more powerful. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Verdict: With its rhythmic street prose, this outstanding memoir reads like an urban fiction novel, reminding us that street lit is a genre-blending literary phenomenon featuring voices that must be heard. Essential for street lit collections. Background: Actress Pearson, renowned for her dramatic work on the HBO series The Wire, has written an honest, inspiring, and forthright account of her rough-and-tumble youth (which included jail time). Pearson shares her insights on the impact of her unstable childhood, spotlights significant mentors who helped her survive, and discusses her lesbian lifestyle, which keeps her heart open to being loved in what has been for her, until now, an unloving world. [Grace After Midnight was originally an Xpress Review last fall, but Vanessa felt that it deserved a second look in the context of street lit.--Ed.]--Vanessa J. Morris, Drexel Univ., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.