Reviews

Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Too outspoken to succeed as a lady's companion or to settle for a marriage of convenience, Minna Bernays seeks a temporary solution to her financial difficulties by moving in with her sister Martha's family. Overwhelmed by managing a household with six young children, Martha welcomes Minna's assistance. Her husband, Sigmund Freud, rarely interacts with the family and concentrates on unconventional psychological theories at odds with those of his academic colleagues. Unlike Martha, Minna finds his ideas about sexuality intriguing, if also disturbing. She tries to deny the physical tension underlying their late-night conversations. Freud has no such qualms. Despite Minna's attempts to break from him, his attraction proves overwhelming. Although this third novel by Mack and Kaufman (Literacy and Longing in L.A.; A Version of the Truth) focuses on Minna, the narrative develops other characters as well. Martha can be manipulator as well as victim. Freud's intellect and charm shine through his self-centeredness. Rumors about Freud and his sister-in-law, who in real life lived with the family for more than 40 years, abound. This novel, inspired by historical events, places the possible affair between Freud and Minna firmly in the intellectual and social milieu of fin de siecle Vienna. VERDICT Historical romance fans will speed through the pages and find fodder for book club discussions. [See Prepub Alert, 1/26/12.]-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State Univ. Lib., Mankato (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.