Reviews

Publishers Weekly
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In this rousing ninth Oregon Files adventure (after 2011's The Jungle) from bestseller Cussler and Du Brul, series hero Juan Cabrillo's attempt to rescue old pal Yuri Borodin from a super-max Siberian prison goes bad. Yuri dies after uttering "Tesla," a reference to Nikola Tesla, the mysterious Serb who invented alternating-current electricity and who is alleged to have developed a number of secret weapons, including a death ray, an earthquake machine, and an invisibility field. Russian fleet admiral Pytor Kenin, "perhaps the second-most corrupt man on the planet," has formed a private army and is using Tesla's secret technology for nefarious purposes. A subplot involves an effort to secure a legendary shipping container with a billion dollars leftover from the second invasion of Iraq, but soon everyone is back to the main mission-trying to thwart Kenin. The conclusion is the usual Cussler nail-biter, though no one ever really expects Juan and his crew to come in second-best. Agent: Peter Lampack, Peter Lampack Agency. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

The latest Oregon Files adventure opens with Juan Cabrillo breaking into a Russian supermax prison to free a friend, the man who had helped outfit Cabrillo's ship, the Oregon, with its high-tech hardware. Shot during the escape, the man soon dies but not before uttering his cryptic last words, about an eerie boat, the Aral Sea, and a name: Tesla. Cabrillo soon one might say almost too slickly soon finds the boat, a pleasure craft built in Pennsylvania for George Westinghouse, who had been a big booster of inventor Nikola Tesla's alternating current (AC) electrical system in the late nineteenth century. That pleasure boat vanished at sea in 1902. But what did a mysterious blue cloud have to do with the disappearance, and how did the boat turn up in the Aral Sea, 10,000 miles from where it vanished? And what does any of this have to do with a modern-day superweapon that could change the face of the world forever? The Oregon Files stories don't represent Cussler's finest work, but fans can depend on them to deliver action and adventure, if not full-bodied characters.--Pitt, David Copyright 2010 Booklist