Reviews

Publishers Weekly
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Memorable, often funny prose complements the crafty plot of Bradley's fifth Flavia de Luce novel (after 2011's I Am Half-Sick of Shadows). The year 1951 marks the 500th anniversary of the death of St. Tancred, who gave his name to 11-year-old Flavia's local church in the village of Bishop's Lacey. That the occasion will include the opening of the saint's tomb excites Flavia, whose curiosity about the excavation leads her to find the body of a murder victim. The precocious and irrepressible Flavia (who was booted from the Girl Guides for "an excess of high spirits") continues to delight. Portraying a 11-year-old as a plausible sleuth and expert in poisons is no mean feat, but Bradley makes it look easy. The reader never loses sight of Flavia's youth, but also never wonders at the likelihood that someone with her qualities exists. Agent: Denise Bukowski, the Bukowski Agency. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Twelve-year-old Flavia de Luce is inordinately interested in death and passionate about poisons. When she's feeling blue, she thinks about cyanide, since its color reflects her mood. She also has a penchant for finding corpses and an extraordinary ability to ferret out the stories behind their untimely deaths. Here she is the first to espy the body of St. Tancred's Church organist Crispin Collicutt during the excavation of the eponymous saint's remains to mark his quincentennial, in 1951. Flavia also must deal with a crisis at home when her widowed father is forced to put the family estate, Buckshaw, up for sale. And while uncovering motives, Flavia also unearths a number of local families' secrets, including some involving her late mother. Bradley's Flavia cozies, set in the English countryside, have been a hit from the start, and this fifth in the series continues to charm and entertain, as Flavia so intellectually mature yet socially unschooled takes advantage of being able to go about unnoticed because of her youth. A final cliff-hanger guarantees interest in the next installment.--Leber, Michele Copyright 2010 Booklist