Reviews

Library Journal
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Carbohydrates create inflammation and ultimately degenerative disease, says neurologist Perlmutter; the book focuses particularly on the brain. (LJ 11/1/13) (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publishers Weekly
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In his latest book, neurologist Perlmutter (The Better Brain Book) declares war on a common foodstuff, attributing a bewilderingly wide assortment of maladies to the consumption of gluten, a substance found in bread and other stock foods. Contrasting modern humans against idealized humans of the distant past, Perlmutter concludes that the former, whose average life expectancy at birth is about twice that of their Paleolithic ancestors, have gone off the proper track. He addresses the churlish objection that gluten has been part of the human diet for many millennia by firmly asserting that recent changes to crops have transformed a once-safe food into a terrible scourge. The book features health advice, a number of gluten-free recipes, and details on some relevant case studies. Lauded by such nonconsensus pundits as Mehmet Oz and William Davis, Perlmutter offers readers a comfortably simplistic model for thinking about carbs. Agent: Bonnie Solow, Solow Literary Enterprises. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Perlmutter, a board-certified neurologist (The Better Brian; Power Up Your Brain) states that carbohydrates are destroying the brain. He maintains that even healthy carbohydrates such as whole grains and fruits can cause dementia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, headaches, and depression. Gluten is the culprit, and a diet that is low in carbohydrates and that contains "good" fats, including cholesterol and protein, is the answer. The book offers useful tips for exercise and improving sleep habits as well as gluten-free recipes, but the overall thesis is controversial. Nonmainstream medical gurus such as Dr. Oz embrace the program, but it's not for -everyone. Verdict An optional purchase; buy where Perlmutter's titles are in demand.-Barbara Bibel, Oakland P.L. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.