Reviews

Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Prolific novelist Hannah revisits the characters, known to fans as "KateandTully," of her bestselling Firefly Lane in this slow-paced but largely well-executed sequel. Tully Hart, the famous 50-year-old former host of the talk show The Girlfriend, isn't dealing well with the recent death of her best friend Kate, whose daughter, Marah, has run away. Tully is Marah's godmother, and Kate's husband Johnny blames her for his daughter's flight. With no one left to turn to, Tully runs her car into a cement block in a haze of booze and prescription drugs. In the hospital clinging to life, Tully faces her past and her pain, visits her dead friend, and decides whether or not life is worth living. Told in a shopworn form-turns and flashbacks from the perspectives of Marah, Johnny, and Tully-the plot is unnecessarily repetitive, at times bringing forward motion to a standstill, but fans will appreciate the depth of character as they wade toward a neatly tied-up and heart-warming denouement. Agent: Andrea Cirillo, the Jane Rotrosen Agency. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Hannah's enthralling and touching sequel to Firefly Lane continues the tale of Tully and Kate's poignant friendship and the journey they still share even in death. Once Kate dies, her husband, Johnny, her daughter Marah, and her soul-sister Tully all fall apart as they struggle to deal with their loss and regret. Losing the only anchor she had, Tully counts on Johnny and the kids to help each other through this process, only to realize that she is shut out, leaving her to mourn alone. Tully quickly finds herself following in her mother's footsteps of addiction, ultimately ending up in a medically induced coma after an "accident." In this state Tully is guided and prodded by Kate to see where things have gone right, where they've gone wrong, and where they can be repaired with some healing and some forgiveness-especially if Tully is willing to face her own past and that of her mother, and not fly away with Kate. VERDICT A moving read about mothers and daughters, families, friends, second chances, love, heartbreak, faith, grieving, and healing. Tissues required.-Anne M. Miskewitch, -Chicago P.L. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Hannah's Firefly Lane (2008), which centered on best-friends-forever Tully Hart and Kate Mularkey, is arguably her most popular work. Her follow-up gives readers an idea of what life is like for Tully and Kate's daughter Marah in the wake of Kate's death from cancer. It's not a pretty picture. Tully, who walked away from her successful talk show after Kate got sick, finds that her career isn't waiting for her when she is ready to come back. Overwhelmed by grief and shunned by Johnny, Kate's grieving husband who wants Tully to stay away from him and Kate's children, Tully turns to prescription drugs and alcohol. Teenage Marah, once popular and brash, retreats into herself. Then hope comes from the most unlikely of sources: Tully's wayward mother, finally sober and now, on the cusp of 70, possibly ready to be the mother Tully has always craved. Readers will be reaching for tissues as they watch the characters they grew to love in Firefly Lane struggle to make peace with Kate's death and find happiness and love. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: So popular is Firefly Lane that Hannah's highly anticipated sequel will be launched with a 500,000 print run, a national author tour, and an enormous promotional campaign.--Huntley, Kristine Copyright 2010 Booklist