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Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Odette, Clarice, and Barbara Jean have been close friends since girlhood, growing up in the 1960s in the southern Indiana town of Plainview. Their personalities and cool good looks earned them the name the Supremes when they'd meet regularly to eat at Earl's All-You-Can-Eat, with Big Earl keeping a watchful eye on them. Now in middle age, the Supremes meet regularly with their husbands for dinner at Earl's, now managed by his son. The aging Supremes and Earl's are institutions in a black community that has seen much progress since the 1950s, when the restaurant became the first black-owned business in a racially divided town. But the town as well as the women have also seen much trouble. Odette makes time in her busy life for the regular visitations of her dead mother, Clarice copes with the humiliation of an unfaithful husband, and Barbara Jean struggles to hide her drinking to assuage the death of her child. Moore intersperses episodes from the past with their current lives, showing their enduring friendship through good times and bad.--Bush, Vanessa Copyright 2010 Booklist


Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

First-time novelist Moore's story of a trio of women nicknamed the Supremes in small-town Indiana-Odette, Clarice, and Barbara Jean-may well become as popular as the books about women's friendship it is being compared to, such as The Help, Waiting to Exhale, and Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe. From high school on, through marriages and children, the three friends regularly get together with their husbands at Earl's All-You-Can-Eat (the first black-owned business in Plainview) to see and be seen, share gossip, and help each other through bad times. Clearly fond of his three imperfect main characters, the author uses warmhearted humor and salty language to bring to life a tight-knit African-American community that's complete with competing churches, wacky relations, a fortune-telling fraud, and the ghost of a drunken Eleanor Roosevelt. VERDICT With salt-of-the-earth characters like fearless Odette, motherless Barbara Jean, and sharp-tongued Clarice, along with an event-filled plot that readers will laugh and cry over, this is a good bet to become a best seller. [See Prepub Alert, 9/27/12; seven-city author tour.]-Laurie Cavanaugh, Wareham Free Lib., MA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Dubbed the Supremes, Odette, Clarice, and Barbara Jean have been friends since their high school days back in the turbulent 1960s. The trio have met every week for 40 years at Earl's All-You-Can-Eat for food and friendship, laughter and tears. VERDICT This is a big-hearted novel, full of humor and appealing characters who make it a delightful read. While we don't ordinarily think of male authors writing women's fiction, Moore gets inside the heads of these women, and his genuine affection for his characters is compellingly evident. (LJ 1/13) (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.