Reviews

Library Journal
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With college applications looming in the near future, Stier started to panic about how her average-performing/committed underachiever/"garden variety" attention deficit disorder (ADD) son would perform on the required SAT college admissions test. Knowing that a high score might be his best way of compensating for his GPA, Stier committed to motivating him by studying for and taking the SAT herself-seven times in a year. She here offers her experience, research, test-taking tips, and more on how the SAT actually works. From Kaplan to Princeton to Kumon to khanacademy.org, Stier immersed herself in every strategic course, cram session, learning tool, and sneaky trick she could tackle in an endeavor to expose the test's inner workings. VERDICT While the image of a mother outgunning her own child on a standardized test seems strange, the book is a fascinating read. Many insights and strategies can be learned here, from "bubbling" techniques to guessing strategies. Woven into Stier's experiment is both a mother's story and a sharp appraisal of the industry of college testing. This might just be one of the big books of 2014. [For more on test-prep materials see "Ready, Set, Test" roundup on p. 102.-Ed.] (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.