Reviews

School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 5-10-Myers uses the same honest and straightforward language that characterizes his young adult fiction to share his ideas about why and how he writes. His earliest childhood memories include being a good reader in school but a socially awkward, combative child. He mentions that he was admonished for "not playing well with others," and describes his transition from reading to writing as a place that allowed him to create his own world of characters. "When I'm writing, I create my own others, and I play very well with them." After recounting his own personal journey, Myers moves on to the craft itself and offers a supportive tone that should inspire young adults. He addresses them directly and draws readers into an intimate conversation about writing. Chapters titled, "Map It Out," "Nice to Meet You," "Then What Happened?," "Leave Your Ego at the Door," and "Pick Yourself Up, Dust Yourself Off" address such topics as coming up with story ideas, developing characters and plot, dealing with helpful criticism, and continuing to practice and revise your work. Myers offers advice on structuring fiction using a six-box outline and nonfiction with a four-box outline, including his own notes to better describe the process. He encourages young writers to focus on things they feel passionate about. He notes, "Pursuing your passions will expand your world. This will make you a better writer." His words sum up his philosophy and they characterize the knowledge that he imparts throughout this useful guide.-Carole Phillips, Greenacres Elementary School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 5-10-Myers uses the same honest and straightforward language that characterizes his young adult fiction to share his ideas about why and how he writes. His earliest childhood memories include being a good reader in school but a socially awkward, combative child. He mentions that he was admonished for "not playing well with others," and describes his transition from reading to writing as a place that allowed him to create his own world of characters. "When I'm writing, I create my own others, and I play very well with them." After recounting his own personal journey, Myers moves on to the craft itself and offers a supportive tone that should inspire young adults. He addresses them directly and draws readers into an intimate conversation about writing. Chapters titled, "Map It Out," "Nice to Meet You," "Then What Happened?," "Leave Your Ego at the Door," and "Pick Yourself Up, Dust Yourself Off" address such topics as coming up with story ideas, developing characters and plot, dealing with helpful criticism, and continuing to practice and revise your work. Myers offers advice on structuring fiction using a six-box outline and nonfiction with a four-box outline, including his own notes to better describe the process. He encourages young writers to focus on things they feel passionate about. He notes, "Pursuing your passions will expand your world. This will make you a better writer." His words sum up his philosophy and they characterize the knowledge that he imparts throughout this useful guide.-Carole Phillips, Greenacres Elementary School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

After 43 years as a writer, with more than 100 books to his credit, Myers currently National Ambassador for Young People's Literature has written a guide to writing for aspiring young authors. Addressing both fiction and nonfiction, Myers offers a wealth of advice that is professional and pragmatic and often couched in the context of his own work, especially Kick (2011), his recent collaboration with teenager Ross Workman (who contributes an epilogue to this book). Myers also gives attention to the many incarcerated youth with whom he has worked over the years. Throughout, he stresses the importance of prewriting planning, outlining, daydreaming (to which he devotes hours each day), and being persistent. In addition to his guide, Myers includes an autobiographical prologue explaining how he became a writer after first becoming an omnivorous reader who haunted his neighborhood library. Feeling that books saved his life, Myers now gives his readers the same opportunity through his advice and his largehearted example.--Cart, Michael Copyright 2010 Booklist