Reviews

Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Townshend-principal songwriter and guitarist for boundary-pushing, hard-living British rock band The Who-lays his life bare in this candid and entertaining autobiography, reflecting on both his personal life and his career as the brains behind one of rock's most successful and influential groups. Townshend details the band's early years as a trendy 1960s Mod outfit, the creative and commercial peaks of the 1970s, and the changes forced by the sudden deaths of drummer Keith Moon (in 1978) and bassist John Entwistle (in 2002). But he also gets personal, tracing his troubled youth, a difficult and affair-ridden marriage, relationships with family members and bandmates, various scandals and legal troubles, and decades-long struggles with alcohol and overwork. Townshend covers a lot of ground and is admirably forthcoming in addressing controversies and personal mistakes, but there is frustratingly little insight into his creative process or songwriting and recording methods. Verdict The lack of perspective into the influential musician's blending of experimental artistry and raw rock 'n' roll power will frustrate some readers, but Townshend's long-awaited memoir is easily recommended to anyone interested in this true rock icon's amazing journey.-Douglas King, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.