Reviews

Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Cornwell, a master of action-packed historical fiction, returns with the fourth book in his Grail Quest series (after Heretic), a vivid, exciting portrayal of medieval warfare as the English and French butcher each other at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 during the Hundred Years War. Nobody writes battle scenes like Cornwell, accurately conveying the utter savagery of close combat with sword, ax, and mace, and the gruesome aftermath. English archer Sir Thomas of Hookton, called the Bastard by his enemies, leads a band of ruthless mercenaries in France. When the French hear of the existence of the sword of Saint Peter, "another Excalibur," they must possess it for its legendary mystical powers, but the English have other ideas. Thomas is ordered by his lord, earl of Northampton, to find the sword first and begins, with his men, a perilous journey of raiding and plundering across southern France, fighting brutal warlords, cunning churchmen, with betrayal everywhere, and French and Scottish knights who vow to kill Thomas for reasons that have nothing to do with the sword. With surprising results, Thomas and his men reach the decisive Battle of Poitiers, a vicious melee that killed thousands, unseated a king, and forced a devastating and short peace on a land ravaged by warfare. Agent: Toby Eady Associates, U.K.. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Hooray! Thomas of Hookton, bastard son of a priest and hero of Cornwell's Grail Quest series (The Archer's Tale; Vagabond; Heretic) is back. Still fighting the French in the bloody Hundred Years War, Thomas and his vicious but principled band of mercenary archers search for the lost sword of Saint Peter, rumored to have the power to grant victory to any who wield it, before corrupt French church officials can get their hands on it.Offering the services of his men to anyone who might pay them, Thomas finds himself uneasily balanced among protecting his men, his abiding faith in God, and his desire to wreck vengeance upon those who would use their power to persecute his loved ones. Verdict Thomas of Hookton is one of Cornwell's most sympathetic and powerfully written characters. His sense of honor, innate dignity, and loyalty to those for whom he feels responsible are palpable and believable. This is a man anyone would want standing by his side in a tight spot. Finally, nobody, but nobody, writes medieval battle scenes better than Cornwell. He creates panoramas of visceral immediacy, both terrifying and glorious, while retaining a sense of humanity and mercy for those who know that grace and honor may exist in the midst of absolute carnage. [See Prepub Alert, 7/30/12.]-Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage P.L., AK (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Although definitely a stand-alone, Cornwell's latest foray into the dark days of the Hundred Years' War features the reappearance of the rascally Thomas of Hookton, aka Le Batard, the main character of his enormously popular Grail Quest trilogy. As Thomas and his band of not-so-merry mercenaries roam the ravaged French countryside in search of pillage and plunder, they are bidden by the Earl of Northhampton to unearth the lost sword of Saint Peter, a mythic weapon purported to bestow on its owner tremendous powers for either good or evil. Naturally, the French are also seeking this holy relic, and all roads lead to Poitiers, where the badly outnumbered English forces wage a fierce battle against their enemies, resulting in one of the most improbably astounding victories of the protracted conflict. In addition to carving out another action-packed martial adventure, Cornwell spotlights one of the most significant but often overlooked battles of the era. High Demand Backstory: Cornwell, the master of martial fiction never lacks an audience and the reappearence of the engaging hero of the Grail Quest provides an added incentive to revisit the pivotal Battle of Poitiers.--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Cornwell, a master of action-packed historical fiction, returns with the fourth book in his Grail Quest series (after Heretic), a vivid, exciting portrayal of medieval warfare as the English and French butcher each other at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 during the Hundred Years War. Nobody writes battle scenes like Cornwell, accurately conveying the utter savagery of close combat with sword, ax, and mace, and the gruesome aftermath. English archer Sir Thomas of Hookton, called the Bastard by his enemies, leads a band of ruthless mercenaries in France. When the French hear of the existence of the sword of Saint Peter, "another Excalibur," they must possess it for its legendary mystical powers, but the English have other ideas. Thomas is ordered by his lord, earl of Northampton, to find the sword first and begins, with his men, a perilous journey of raiding and plundering across southern France, fighting brutal warlords, cunning churchmen, with betrayal everywhere, and French and Scottish knights who vow to kill Thomas for reasons that have nothing to do with the sword. With surprising results, Thomas and his men reach the decisive Battle of Poitiers, a vicious melee that killed thousands, unseated a king, and forced a devastating and short peace on a land ravaged by warfare. Agent: Toby Eady Associates, U.K.. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Hooray! Thomas of Hookton, bastard son of a priest and hero of Cornwell's Grail Quest series (The Archer's Tale; Vagabond; Heretic) is back. Still fighting the French in the bloody Hundred Years War, Thomas and his vicious but principled band of mercenary archers search for the lost sword of Saint Peter, rumored to have the power to grant victory to any who wield it, before corrupt French church officials can get their hands on it.Offering the services of his men to anyone who might pay them, Thomas finds himself uneasily balanced among protecting his men, his abiding faith in God, and his desire to wreck vengeance upon those who would use their power to persecute his loved ones. Verdict Thomas of Hookton is one of Cornwell's most sympathetic and powerfully written characters. His sense of honor, innate dignity, and loyalty to those for whom he feels responsible are palpable and believable. This is a man anyone would want standing by his side in a tight spot. Finally, nobody, but nobody, writes medieval battle scenes better than Cornwell. He creates panoramas of visceral immediacy, both terrifying and glorious, while retaining a sense of humanity and mercy for those who know that grace and honor may exist in the midst of absolute carnage. [See Prepub Alert, 7/30/12.]-Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage P.L., AK (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Although definitely a stand-alone, Cornwell's latest foray into the dark days of the Hundred Years' War features the reappearance of the rascally Thomas of Hookton, aka Le Batard, the main character of his enormously popular Grail Quest trilogy. As Thomas and his band of not-so-merry mercenaries roam the ravaged French countryside in search of pillage and plunder, they are bidden by the Earl of Northhampton to unearth the lost sword of Saint Peter, a mythic weapon purported to bestow on its owner tremendous powers for either good or evil. Naturally, the French are also seeking this holy relic, and all roads lead to Poitiers, where the badly outnumbered English forces wage a fierce battle against their enemies, resulting in one of the most improbably astounding victories of the protracted conflict. In addition to carving out another action-packed martial adventure, Cornwell spotlights one of the most significant but often overlooked battles of the era. High Demand Backstory: Cornwell, the master of martial fiction never lacks an audience and the reappearence of the engaging hero of the Grail Quest provides an added incentive to revisit the pivotal Battle of Poitiers.--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Cornwell, a master of action-packed historical fiction, returns with the fourth book in his Grail Quest series (after Heretic), a vivid, exciting portrayal of medieval warfare as the English and French butcher each other at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 during the Hundred Years War. Nobody writes battle scenes like Cornwell, accurately conveying the utter savagery of close combat with sword, ax, and mace, and the gruesome aftermath. English archer Sir Thomas of Hookton, called the Bastard by his enemies, leads a band of ruthless mercenaries in France. When the French hear of the existence of the sword of Saint Peter, "another Excalibur," they must possess it for its legendary mystical powers, but the English have other ideas. Thomas is ordered by his lord, earl of Northampton, to find the sword first and begins, with his men, a perilous journey of raiding and plundering across southern France, fighting brutal warlords, cunning churchmen, with betrayal everywhere, and French and Scottish knights who vow to kill Thomas for reasons that have nothing to do with the sword. With surprising results, Thomas and his men reach the decisive Battle of Poitiers, a vicious melee that killed thousands, unseated a king, and forced a devastating and short peace on a land ravaged by warfare. Agent: Toby Eady Associates, U.K.. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Hooray! Thomas of Hookton, bastard son of a priest and hero of Cornwell's Grail Quest series (The Archer's Tale; Vagabond; Heretic) is back. Still fighting the French in the bloody Hundred Years War, Thomas and his vicious but principled band of mercenary archers search for the lost sword of Saint Peter, rumored to have the power to grant victory to any who wield it, before corrupt French church officials can get their hands on it.Offering the services of his men to anyone who might pay them, Thomas finds himself uneasily balanced among protecting his men, his abiding faith in God, and his desire to wreck vengeance upon those who would use their power to persecute his loved ones. Verdict Thomas of Hookton is one of Cornwell's most sympathetic and powerfully written characters. His sense of honor, innate dignity, and loyalty to those for whom he feels responsible are palpable and believable. This is a man anyone would want standing by his side in a tight spot. Finally, nobody, but nobody, writes medieval battle scenes better than Cornwell. He creates panoramas of visceral immediacy, both terrifying and glorious, while retaining a sense of humanity and mercy for those who know that grace and honor may exist in the midst of absolute carnage. [See Prepub Alert, 7/30/12.]-Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage P.L., AK (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Although definitely a stand-alone, Cornwell's latest foray into the dark days of the Hundred Years' War features the reappearance of the rascally Thomas of Hookton, aka Le Batard, the main character of his enormously popular Grail Quest trilogy. As Thomas and his band of not-so-merry mercenaries roam the ravaged French countryside in search of pillage and plunder, they are bidden by the Earl of Northhampton to unearth the lost sword of Saint Peter, a mythic weapon purported to bestow on its owner tremendous powers for either good or evil. Naturally, the French are also seeking this holy relic, and all roads lead to Poitiers, where the badly outnumbered English forces wage a fierce battle against their enemies, resulting in one of the most improbably astounding victories of the protracted conflict. In addition to carving out another action-packed martial adventure, Cornwell spotlights one of the most significant but often overlooked battles of the era. High Demand Backstory: Cornwell, the master of martial fiction never lacks an audience and the reappearence of the engaging hero of the Grail Quest provides an added incentive to revisit the pivotal Battle of Poitiers.--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2010 Booklist