Reviews

Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

This is an exceptional historical-personal narrative of the civil rights trail as lived by Cobb (senior writer, AllAfrica.com; coauthor, with Robert P. Moses, Radical Equations). A member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the late 1960s, Cobb is well equipped to take us on this journey, situating for us the schools, churches, courthouses, and lunch counters that were the battlegrounds of the grass-roots Civil Rights Movement. Cobb guides us through Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, and Alabama, ending in a moving report on Tennessee. His historical perspective is vast, utilizing early American slave revolts and the retrenchment of racist policies following the end of Reconstruction as departure points for the later freedom struggle and drawing on interviews and incredible pictures to show us the trail through haunting imagery. His book is a singular creation, no mere tour guide but a kind of time capsule preserving the memory of those who gave their lives to the movement. For academic or public libraries.--Jim Hahn, Univ. of Illinois Lib., Urbana (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Part history, part travel guide, this book focuses mostly on the South and the civil rights struggle in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Cobb (coauthor, Radical Equations) begins in the U.S. capital and works his way to sites in North Carolina and Alabama, where pioneers of the movement marched, met in churches, and sat in at lunch counters. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice
Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.

Former field secretary to the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (1962-67), Cobb has produced a guide to the landmark sites of the Civil Rights Movement that at times is more of a travel memoir, particularly as he describes the places where civil rights workers fought, bled, and sometimes died in the fight for freedom. In presenting this guide, Cobb had two primary goals: to relate important stories of the movement, particularly how grassroots organization effected change in various communities throughout the South; and to provide a guide to some (but not all) of the significant sites associated with civil rights from the 1940s through the 1960s. Cobb's journey begins in Washington, DC, and leads through Maryland into Virginia, the Carolinas, and finally the Deep South. The final chapter appropriately takes readers to Tennessee, the site of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Throughout each chapter, Cobb develops a guided tour of the state's landmarks, limited to three to four cities/towns, interwoven with his historical narrative. An epilogue considers some additional important sites not included in the book's main chapters. For the purposes of trip planning, one would certainly require additional resources like the National Park Service's We Shall Overcome: Historic Places of the Civil Rights Movement (CH, Jun'05, 42-5646) for information on specific locations, hours, and contact information. Cobb's work, however, provides a look at these sites through the eyes of a movement insider, a perspective not likely found in popular guides. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-level undergraduates, general readers. L. K. Speer Southeast Missouri State University