Reviews

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

All Updike needs is the Nobel Prize to complete his list of major awards. In the very early years of his career, he seemed to spring full fledged as a short story writer, so he can hardly be said to have a body of apprentice work, to which this compilation of his early stories attests. They are mature pieces, and the collection contains several stories still considered masterpieces and which continue to appear in anthologies; these would include, of course, "A & P" and "Pigeon Feathers." What is particularly exciting to see is the publication again of his wonderful Olinger stories, particular favorites of Updike fans and, up to this point, out of print. The collection contains a grand total of 102 stories, and most were originally published in the New Yorker0 , Updike's basic professional residence during these years. But his New Yorker0 ties should not be considered a drawback to the enjoyment of his work, for his ingenuity, scope, and heart extend far beyond the island of Manhattan. --Brad Hooper Copyright 2003 Booklist


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Starting with "Ace in the Hole," a student work: 103 great stories. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

All of Updike's retrospective collections are huge, as if nothing could be discarded, and this one is no exception. The title is somewhat misleading. "Early stories" suggests juvenilia or apprentice work, but Updike's famously elegant and evocative prose style apparently emerged full blown with his first New Yorker publication. A more accurate title would be Classic Updike. Most of Updike's best-known stories are here, including "Pigeon Feathers," "The Family Meadow," "Separating," and "The Witnesses." The book opens with the Pennsylvania-based Olinger stories, moves through the anguished Maples saga of marital dysfunction in suburban Tarbox, and concludes with studies of the single life, including "The Bulgarian Poetess," featuring Updike's alter ego, Henry Bech. Stories that originally aimed at slice-of-life immediacy now appear as exquisite genre paintings of a lost America, thanks in part to Updike's strong visual sense. This wonderful collection is arguably the best single-volume introduction to Updike's work available. Highly recommended for all fiction collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 7/03.]-Edward B. St. John, Loyola Law Sch. Lib., Los Angeles (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.