Reviews

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Gr. 3^-6. Scientist and television personality Nye introduces young readers to the amazing, sometimes mysterious biome that covers nearly three-quarters of the earth's surface. He discusses marine animals and plants, salinity, currents, tides, the effects of earthquakes and tsunamis, and contemporary methods of exploration. Each chapter includes several illustrations, mostly in full color, as well as photographs, numerous sidebars, and an experiment designed to demonstrate a scientific principle. Most of the experiments are easily duplicated, use readily accessible materials, and can be performed without adult help. Specialized vocabulary is defined within the text, and the table of contents is fairly extensive. An attractive choice for classroom science lessons, this may also appeal to browsers. --Kay Weisman


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 3-6-Adapting a print format to fit the somewhat shotgun approach of TV, "The Science Guy" stars in his own book on our planetary ocean, its landscapes, and denizens. Sound bites of data and random factoids abound in the rather shallow waters here, skittering about like a school of tiny bait fish pursued by a predator and leaving bright, disconnected flashes of information briefly impressed on the mental retina. For example, in the chapter on "Sea Jellies" readers encounter a short paragraph on these glutinous creatures, a boxed sidebar defining "invertebrates," another one on cephalopods, a "Check It Out" caption on sea cucumbers, and another brief paragraph on sea stars. These three pages (which also include two large and three small illustrations, a decorative border, a chapter heading, and liberal amounts of white space) are concluded by an experiment. Promising in its format and written by a familiar face that pops up on PBS daily, this title is eye-catching and appealing. It makes its subject look like fun. But does it offer a real learning experience? Sometimes.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.