Reviews

School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PreS-Gr 2-This takeoff on American Bandstand adds a twist to learning-to-tell-time books. Click Dark, the bat-version host of American Batstand, leads the 12-hour dance program. A rhyming verse teaches children how to tell time while dancing to the oldies. The enthusiastic bats jitterbug, do the swim, the locomotion, the twist with "Chubby Checkers," the hootchi-coo, and the bugaloo. At the bottom of each page, a mouse holds a clock that advances from 1:00 p.m. to 12:00 midnight as the show progresses. In a satisfying conclusion, as the TV audience awaits the "final demonstration," a solitary bat leaps out-in blue suede shoes. The rhymes are delightful and the narrative jives right along. Children will love them.-Wendy S. Carroll, Montclair Cooperative School, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Ages 5^-7. The infectious energy of Sweet's pop-eyed, floppy-winged bats shows no signs of abating in this third wild rumpus, after Bat Jamboree (1996) and Bats on Parade (1999). Emceed by host Click Dark, a twelve-hour dance program takes bats coast to coast through the Shrug, the Jitterbug, the Swim, the Twist, the Locomotion, and so on, capped by a set from the bat king himself, in blue suede shoes. Though it's all supposed to be an exercise in telling time, and a small clock face in the corner marks off each hour, the irregularly rhymed text's heavy beat and the multitude of boogie-mad bats are going to crowd the pedagogic intent out of the front seat for most young readers and listeners. No matter; though this can't touch Dan Harper's Telling Time with Big Mama Cat (1998) as a teaching tool, it's an irresistible invitation to children (and adults of a certain age) to get up and dance in the aisles. --John Peters