Title Profile & Character Information

Daring Greatly

Annotation
Researcher and thought leader Dr. Brené Brown offers a powerful new vision in Daring Greatly that encourages us to embrace vulnerability and imperfection, to live wholeheartedly and courageously. Every day we experience the uncertainty, risks, and emotional exposure that define what it means to be vulnerable, or to dare greatly. Whether the arena is a new relationship, an important meeting, our creative process, or a difficult family conversation, we must find the courage to walk into vulnerability and engage with our whole hearts. In Daring Greatly, Dr. Brown challenges everything we think we know about vulnerability. Based on twelve years of research, she argues that vulnerability is not weakness, but rather our clearest path to courage, engagement, and meaningful connection. Daring Greatly will spark a new spirit of truth and trust in our organizations, families, schools, and communities.

'A wonderful book: urgent, essential and fun to read. I couldn't put it down, and it continues to resonate with me' -Seth Godin, author of Linchpin

'It is only by embracing our vulnerability, daring to expose that whole heart, that we can properly connect. It's thought-provoking stuff' -Stella Magazine, The Sunday Telegraph

Brené Brown, Ph.D., LMSW is a New York Times bestselling author and a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. She is a nationally renowned speaker and has won numerous teaching awards, including the College's Outstanding Faculty Award. Her groundbreaking work was the subject of a PBS special called "The Gifts of Imperfection" and has been featured on NPR and CNN. Her 2010 TEDx talk on the topic of vulnerability went viral and has been translated into 38 languages, and she will be a featured National TED speaker in 2012. Brené is also the author of The Gifts of Imperfection and I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't).



GenreNonFiction
Psychological
TopicsCourage
Psychology
Conduct of life
Life changes
Leadership
Parenthood
Guilt
Shame